Top 100 Personal Finance Blogs

Finance BlogsYour parents probably told you that there are three things you don't discuss publicly — politics, religion, and money. But Technorati, that storehouse of weblog rankings, indicates that there are over 800 blogs about personal finance (pfblogs). So much for listening to your parents.

According to the 2006 "World Wealth Report", there were 8.7 million millionaires worldwide in 2005, a 6.5% increase from 2004. So pfblogs are likely to grow in popularity. Here's a sampling of 100 pfblogs, chosen based on a multitude of criteria ranging from Alexa ranking to Technorati ranking. Some of the bloggers indicated here are financial experts, others share their hard-learned wisdom, baring their finances and souls. Note that certain types of blogs were left out:

  • Pure business and entrepreneurial blogs.
  • Sites that haven't been updated in months.
  • Sites with an abundance of recent non-finance posts.
  • Sites that are overly localized and thus not of interest to most readers.

Please note that this is by no means an exhaustive list of all of the great personal finance blogs out there. This is simply a list of Ask the Advisor's favorite 100. Chances are you may have favorites that are not included here, and that's okay because this is meant to be subjective. Also note that after our "Top 10" section, the rest of the list is not ranked but rather is ordered alphabetically within each topic.

Jump to section: Top 10 | Babes, Chicks, and Divas | Dollars and Cents | Finances | General Personal Finance Advice | How to Be a Millionaire | Investing and Business | Money, Money, Money, Money | Savings, Debt, Credit, Frugality, and Taxes | Singles, Couples, Single Parents, Families, Retired, or Retiring | Youth/Under-30, College Students, Recent Graduates


Ask the Advisor's Top 10

Personal finance blogs have their own hierarchy of popularity. Here is Ask the Advisor's Top 10 list, derived through a magic formula.

  1. The Motley Fool is an ultra-popular site that targets the average investor. While it is mostly about investing, they do have several useful sections including Personal Finance.

  2. Blogging Stocks team of 20 or so bloggers tracks news about various stocks. Request one if you don't see it.

  3. Get Rich Slowly takes the organic approach to wealth, looking at savings, frugality, and retirement tips.

  4. My Money Blog gives tips about money goals, taxes, bank promos, and info about specific money-saving opportunities.

  5. Blueprint for Financial Prosperity gives solid advice about personal finance, with detailed examples of options for resolving debt issues, home equity, etc.

  6. The Simple Dollar offers down to Earth personal finance advice "for the rest of us", including money talk amongst family members — sometimes the most difficult of all.

  7. Free Money Finance focuses on tips for "growing your net worth", with sage advice about dealing mortgage terms, taxes, financial goals and priorities, etc.

  8. Consumerism Commentary mixes it up with info about credit, financial terms, book giveaways, financial blog carnivals, software and more.

  9. PFBlog documents a journey towards financial independence and at least $1M by age 36, with tips about taxes, 401(k) plans, home equity, mutual funds, and credit.

  10. Personal Finance Advice is the straight goods from a veteran pf writer. The mini bio says he started writing for US expats living in Japan.

Babes, Chicks, and Divas

These bloggers have declared themselves proudly female, either in their domain name or blog name.

  1. Boston Gal's Open Wallet. Can a 30-something single Bostonian girl find enlightenment in her net worth?

  2. Budgeting Babe. Shopping can be a very cathartic experience. And expensive. Budgeting Babe teaches all the Carrie Bradshaw (Sex in the City) wannabes how not to get "Carrie-d" away.

  3. City Girl's Financial Blog. City Girl's kept her heart in San Francisco and laid out her financial plans for the next 30 years.

  4. Mapgirl's Fiscal Challenge may be "freaked out about" her financial future, but she has challenged herself to do something about it and share her knowledge with you.

  5. The Frugal Duchess. When Sharon Harvey Rosenberg isn't writing about money for the Miami Herald, she's blogging her frugal fashion and lifestyle advice.

Dollars and Cents

What's that old saw about watching the pennies and the dollars taking care of themselves?

  1. 22 Dollars. A mix of wealth-mindedness, savings, real estate and investing.

  2. Binary Dollar. The South Park-like character in the logo might give you a clue: personal finance for dummies.

  3. Cents to Save is Missy's sharing of her constant effort to improve her financial knowledge.

  4. Dimes to Dollars. A young navy wife dispenses her personal finance advice, prefering to focus on the dimes, not the pennies.

  5. Five Cent Nickel talks about saving that extra little bit of money for the family, including issues like borrowing a neighbor's unsecured wireless Internet connection.

  6. My Two Dollars. A married guy talks about saving money on books + college, simple tips, frugality, and financial sacrifices.

  7. Penny Foolish. Kira's a recent college grad who hasn't been watching the pennies, but is trying not to make big mistakes.

  8. QueerCents. Do gays and lesbians need supplement financial advice? If so, QueerCents can provide it. Don't forget the coupons.

Finances

All the blogs here are about personal finance, but these are extra-focused.

  1. All Financial Matters focuses on budgeting, asset allocation, 401(k) and IRA, insurance, financial planning and more.

  2. Finance News Today covers a variety of personal finances topics including insurance, mortage, investing, real estate, and retirement.

  3. FIRE Finance discusses tax software, online banking, brokerages and investing, and recession-proofing as preparation for early retirement.

  4. Getting Finances Done offers stress-free advice on ways to save money, as well discussions of how finances affect relationships.

  5. Hill's Personal Finance is pretty much everything you probably want to know about CDs (Certificates of Deposit), investing, mortgages, and estate and financial planning.

  6. Kirby on Finance talks about general finance and economy as well personal finance, employment, frugal living, real estate and investing.

  7. My Financial Journey documents a software developer's personal goal of having a $100,000 investment portfolio by 30.

  8. The Finance Journey is penned by a mid-20s computer analyst and discusses saving, spending, and bargain hunting, with a bit of stock marketing investing.

  9. The Financial Ladder details "the financial progress" of a married man and his wife, and includes tips on taxes, and wealth + poverty mindedness.

General Personal Finance Advice

These blogs specialize in offering actionable advice.

  1. Aridni is a group of pfbloggers who ask: isn't it your turn to cash in?

  2. Ask Uncle Bill, would-be finance book author, who decided to blog and offer free advice instead. Check out Stupid card tricks, about managing credit cards.

  3. Bryan C. Fleming uses catchy post titles such as How to work less and get more done and How to beat the stock market to draw in regular readers.

  4. Credit Card Lowdown, the permanent host for the Carnival of Credit Card Debt, gives you all the news about credit cards, as well loads of tips about saving.

  5. Finding Freedom. Gotten yourself into debt from mistakes and poor judgment? Steven writes about Finding Freedom and his way out.

  6. Frank the Financially Savvy Atheist and 20-something father of three dispenses his own blend of financial advice with "a hint of blasphemy".

  7. It's Your Money: Money Musings. Michael turned 30 and had an epiphany about not wanting to become a consumer-credit statistic.

  8. My Open Wallet. What's in her wallet? Thirty-something Madame X of Brooklyn bares all - her financial details, that is, and how she saves.

  9. OSA Watch is a blend of advice about savings, frugality, and liquid investing tips, mixed with news and info about Online Savings Accounts (OSAs).

  10. Stubborn Capitalist combines personal finance and personal development, a combo that more people would be wise to consider.

  11. The Digerati Life is about money and personal finance in Silicon Valley.

How to Be a Millionaire

Not just about money but how to make lots of money.

  1. 2 Million. Forget one million. 2 Million is a journey towards just that, with loads of practical advice for saving and investing.

  2. Enough Wealth asks how much is enough and can it be passed on, and shares investment ideas and financial advice.

  3. How to Make a Million Dollars is a bold approach for self-motivation towards that goal.

  4. Million Dollar Countdown already has $100,000 in a retirement account and is investing it towards one million within 10 years.

  5. Million Dollar Journey is by a Canadian, but the post dissecting an MSN Money article on how a single mom is surviving on $12,000/year is of interest to everyone.

  6. My 1st Million at 33 features a number of writers but Frugal shares "humble thoughts on the journey to wealth" as well as number of financial calculators.

  7. To One Million and Beyond's Matt is 29 and giving himself until 35 to have over a million in assets. His site is his "sounding board".

Investing and Business

These blogs are about personal finance but with a leaning towards investing and business.

  1. All Business focuses on finance advice for the small business owner.

  2. Live Learn Invest is about wise investing to generate passive income, as a backup revenue stream to employment.

  3. ETF Trends keeps a grip on the exchange traded fund industry.

  4. The Corner Office is one entrepreneur's thoughts on business, personal finance, frugality, health and fitness and more.

  5. Vinvesting is all about "value investing" and focuses on opportunities in the stock and real estate markets.

Money, Money, Money, Money

Guess what these blogs are about.

  1. Accumulating Money. Another twenty-something documents his experiences towards accumulating a million dollars in net worth.

  2. Adult ADD and Money showcases the writings of several authors about personal finance for adults with ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder).

  3. Art of Money, inspired by Robert Kiyosaki's Rich Dad books, focuses on personal finance with a strong leaning towards business on the Internet.

  4. A Penny Saved doesn't hold back on the technical terms in personal finance and investing, but explains them and shares advice.

  5. Fearless Money takes the approach that the "Universe truly is a benevolent place" and recently quit his job to sample the ambundance of other opportunities.

  6. Its Just Money and we don't need to be obsessed with it. A business/economics graduate shares general financial advice.

  7. Just Another Money Blog is about sharing tips on savings, such as on movie tickets and moving to another country to increase net worth.

  8. Mad Money Machine plays off the popularity of MSNBC's Mad Money with Jim Cramer and is declared a must-read audioblog (podcast and articles) by Kiplingers.

  9. Medicated Money. A twenty-something couple give their prescription for managing finances and staying out of debt.

  10. Money Blog Network is actually a collection finance blogs collated for convenience.

  11. Money Crashers is based on 11 principles and offers "financial fitness" advice for young people, with topics including college, credit and debt, and marriage and money.

  12. Money Smartz focuses on highlighting reliable personal finance resources for a number of categories including debt and bankruptcy, financial planning, and money management.

  13. Money Tortoise is yet another blog of the slow, steady wealth approach - this one penned by a professional financial planner.

  14. Money, Matter, and More Musings makes the attempt for personal finance to not be boring, offering advice on a variety of topics.

  15. My Money Forest. Who says money doesn't grow on trees? My Money Forest gives general personal finance advice for everyone.

  16. My Money Path is written by a CPA (Certified Public Accountant) and shares the financial goings on in his and his wife's life.

  17. Sound Money Tips gives tips on making money as well as saving money (such as when buying a new suit).

  18. The Time and Money Group. Sometimes wealth takes longer than you might like. For this author, it took over 20 years. Learn from his mistakes.

  19. The Weight of Money looks at the implications of money on family and relationships.

Savings, Debt, Credit, Frugality and Taxes

This is the stuff that most people managing their personal finances are concerned about.

  1. Blogging Away Debt makes no bones about taking up pfblogging in the hopes of earning enough ad revenue to alleviate debt, reveal incoming and expenditures in the process.

  2. Credit Cave helps you out of the dark cave of debt with some solid writing such as How to avoid maxing your credit line.

  3. Debtective. The mysterious Debtective, inspired by personal finance advisor Dave Ramsey, helps you look for clues re debt and credit.

  4. Debt Hater, a medical journalist, is another "debt free by 30" personal finance writer.

  5. Debt in Seattle blends in cooking tips with advice about budgets, taxes, and frugality.

  6. Dont Mess With Taxes is chock full of journalist Kay Bell's advice for make tax tasks less taxing.

  7. Mighty Bargain Hunter discusses bargains and savings, with a good measure of finance and spending thrown in.

  8. Make Love Not Debt's tag cloud shows a big mix of topics with a leaning towards debt, net worth and retirement.

  9. No Credit Needed is based on the premise that you can live in modern society without (over)using credit.

  10. The Savvy Saver is all about personal prosperity. It's not "how much money you make, but on how much you keep." Wise words on the road to prosperity.

  11. Tired of Being Broke is a 20-something who has the goal of being debt-free by 30.

Singles, Couples, Single Parents, Families, Retired, or Retiring

Surely you fit into one of these sub-categories.

  1. Adventure Money. Some people live to travel, literally. Adventure Money offers money-saving tips that help him satisfy his world Jones.

  2. DINKs Finance. DINKS are Dual Income No Kids couples. Miel and James are newlyweds who give personal finance advice for other DINKs.

  3. Retiring Early is more than 90% of the way to one million in assets, and offers for getting there yourself.

  4. Single Ma's Fabulous Financials is a about a 30-something single mom with an MBA striving for financial independence and dishing up some advice.

  5. We're in Debt and we're doing something about it. Here's how.

Youth/Under-30, College Students, Recent Graduates

Whether you're young or young at heart - no lazy bums here.

  1. A Life After College writes about trying to tackle their resulting student debt.

  2. Brokeass Student. At least Young and Broke has already graduated. Brokeass Student has a ways to go yet.

  3. English Major Money. Now who better to write about managing money - an English major who has none.

  4. Financial Aid Podcast. Students can interact with Financial Aid Podcast to find information and resources about loans and debt relief.

  5. Frugal Law Student. How frugal is this student? Does 25 ways to cook an egg give you an idea?

  6. Gen X Finance. There's a lot of confusion about the proper definition of a Generation X person, but whatever it is, Gen X Finance focuses on this group.

  7. I Will Teach You To Be Rich. Personal finance and entrepreneurship tips for students, recent grads, and other young people.

  8. Personal Finance for Students and Fresh Grads. Are you just out of school and planning to be a future millionaire? Here's a good starting point.

  9. Well-Heeled's Wanda justifies someone else's expenditure of $5,000/year on shoes. I think they both need to read Budgeting Babe (above).

  10. Young and Broke. Married, 20-something and the child of two MBA parents, Young and Broke is learning to cope.

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